"The Art of Grafting"
 
The remains of an old boat called “The Rosebud” were found in estuary mud near The Project and offered to me as materials for a new sculpture. The idea we used was to make several individual sculptures each consisting of one remnant scarfed (in this case half-lapped and bolted) onto a stem of newly sawn oak. These would reflect the technique known as grafting, which fruit growers use to perpetuate rare or vulnerable varieties. By raising these beautiful fragments of the boat onto long vertical stems (as in sturdy rootstock) I’m kind of saying: it is our loss if we discard the old, the fragile, and the rare. It is the quietest sculpture I’ve done so far.
 
   
Concept Design: remnants of "The Rosebud" scarfed onto oak uprights (as if rootstock)
Rough Sketch showing dimensions of the eleven pieces
Details of how the uprights were matched to individual remnants
Images of the bolted connections between old and unused oak
Images of the bolted connections between old and unused oak
Detail at Eden – Blue Tips against Blue Sky, with bronze foliage mirroring the rusty colours on the old oak
 
 
Images of the quiet line